Nashville Foot and Ankle Group: Board Certified Podiatric Physicians



Nashville Foot and Ankle Group:
Board Certified Podiatric Physicians


Call us and make an appointment today!
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We Are: Four board certified Nashville podiatrists providing quality foot care for the entire family for over 20 years.

With seven locations across Nashville, there is definitely a podiatrist near you. If you need a podiatrist in Nashville, call one of our offices today!

Dr. Steven Head
Southern Hills Medical Center, SE Nashville
Call: 615.333.2555
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Dr. Gary Cockrell
Brentwood / Franklin | North Nashville
Call: 615.370.8880
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Dr. Berkeley Nicholls
Downtown Nashville | Hermitage | Smyrna
Call: 615.321.3668
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Dr. Therese Tlapek
West Nashville / White Bridge Road
Call: 615.353.0626
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Nashville Podiatrists Blog:

All Toes on Deck : Protecting your Feet from the Summer Heat


"Even if you are just lying still on your back soaking up the rays, your feet are still vulnerable," says American Podiatric Medical Association member Jane Andersen, DPM. "You can seriously sunburn your feet and no matter how upscale your hotel, athlete's foot can lurk in all public pool areas."


OUR BIGGEST SUMMER TIPS:

Limit walking barefoot, as it exposes feet to sunburn, as well as plantar warts, athlete's foot, ringworm, and other infections and also increases risk of injury to your feet.

Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. Drinking water will not only help with overall health, but will also minimize any foot swelling caused by the heat.

Remember to apply sunscreen all over your feet, especially the tops and fronts of ankles, and don’t forget to reapply after you’ve been in the water.

Wear shoes or flip-flops around the pool, to the beach, in the locker room, and even on the carpeting or in the bathroom of your hotel room to prevent injuries and limit the likelihood of contracting any bacterial infections.

Keep blood flowing with periodic ankle flexes, toe wiggles, and calf stretches.



Call your nearest Nashville Podiatrist for more information.

April is National Foot Awareness Month!


Along with the warmer weather and sunnier skies, people are coming out from their winter hibernation mode and getting more active again. With more runners on park trails and neighborhood sidewalks, and spring and summer sports starting back up again, foot health awareness is more important now than at any other time all year!

PLAY IT SAFE WITH TODAY'S PODIATRIST

PLAYING SPORTS IS A GREAT WAY TO EXERCISE, SPEND TIME WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY, AND DEVELOP TEAM-BUILDING SKILLS. BUT DID YOU KNOW THAT ANKLE SPRAINS AND BREAKS ARE AMONG THE MOST COMMON SPORTS INJURIES FOR BOTH ADULTS AND CHILDREN?

"For many of us, sports are an integral part of our lives. To get the most out of your workout or from playing a favorite sport, it’s important to choose the right footwear for the type of exercise you’ll engage in,” says Phillip Ward, DPM, a podiatrist and president of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). “People should be aware that sports, which require a substantial amount of running, turning, and contact, can translate to injuries. If you or someone you know sustains a foot or ankle-related injury while playing sports, it’s important to see a podiatrist right away.”

Unfortunately, there are many myths surrounding foot and ankle injuries, which may cause a patient to delay seeking treatment.



A 2014 ESPN POLL SHOWED THAT 88 PERCENT OF PARENTS HAVE CONCERNS ABOUT THEIR CHILDREN’S RISK OF INJURY WHILE PLAYING YOUTH SPORTS.

A 2014 APMA SURVEY SHOWED THAT 1 IN 4 ADULTS FEELS UNABLE TO EXERCISE DUE TO FOOT PAIN, AND 39 PERCENT OF ADULTS SAID THEY WOULD EXERCISE MORE IF THEIR FEET DIDN’T HURT


HERE ARE THE TOP FIVE MYTHS TO STOP BELIEVING NOW:

“IT CAN’T BE BROKEN BECAUSE I CAN MOVE IT.”

False.

You can walk with certain kinds of fractures. Common examples include breaks in the smaller, outer bone of the lower leg, small chip fractures of the foot or ankle bones, and the often-neglected fracture of the toe.

“IF YOU BREAK A TOE, IMMEDIATE CARE ISN’T NECESSARY.”

False.

A toe fracture needs prompt attention. X-rays will reveal if it is a simple, displaced fracture or an angulated break. Your podiatrist can develop the right treatment plan once he or she has identified the type of break.

“IF YOU HAVE A FOOT OR ANKLE INJURY, SOAK IT IN HOT WATER IMMEDIATELY.”

False.

Heat promotes blood flow and can cause greater swelling, which can lead to more pain. An ice bag wrapped in a towel is the ideal temporary treatment before you see your podiatrist.

“APPLYING AN ELASTIC BANDAGE TO A SEVERELY SPRAINED ANKLE IS ADEQUATE TREATMENT.”

False.

Ankle sprains often mean torn or severely overstretched ligaments, and they should receive immediate care.

“THE TERMS ‘FRACTURE,’ ‘BREAK,’ AND ‘CRACK’ ARE ALL DIFFERENT.”

False.

All of those words are appropriate for describing a broken bone.


REMEMBER, A DELAY IN TREATMENT CAN CAUSE TOE DEFORMITIES AND OTHER PODIATRIC PROBLEMS.

DOCTORS OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE ARE PODIATRIC PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, ALSO KNOWN AS PODIATRISTS, QUALIFIED BY THEIR EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND EXPERIENCE TO DIAGNOSE AND TREAT CONDITIONS AFFECTING THE FOOT, ANKLE, AND RELATED STRUCTURES OF THE LEG.

Call your nearest Nashville Podiatrist for more information.

Proper Running Form to Avoid Foot Injury: Heel Strike versus Midfoot Strike

Here's one runner's take on how the foot should strike the pavement when running.

He favors the midfoot strike to avoid unnecessary shock and injury to the foot:



However not all runners agree.

Here's another treatment of the topic at USATriathalon.org:

Which is a better way for me to run, midfoot or heel striking? The answer is a definite and resounding, yes to either one.

Currently there is no research that proves either is better. All we know is that faster runners in shorter events, up to about 10k, tend to run with either their midfoot touching first and in most cases then lowering their heel like applying an L-shaped piece of carbon fiber onto the surface for elastic loading.

At slower speeds in distances over a mile, most runners heel strike first. Good runners also tend to heel strike when they run slow and long.

The only thing we know for certain is that runners who habitually run shod (with shoes) and then learn to run on their midfoot, reduce the shock around their knees and this shock shows up as increased stress in their plantar fasciae and Achilles’ tendons as well as the calf muscles.

Even when looking at middle distance runners, we notice that they are likely to start off running midfoot, and as they fatigue, they heel strike more.

And Jessica Leitch, director of the Run3D Clinic in Oxford, says:

"Heel striking has received more negative press than it deserves.

The evidence simply doesn’t support the theory that everyone should run with a midfoot or forefoot strike to avoid injury.

Yes, it alters loading mechanics, with joints and tissues stressed differently by different footstrike types, but in doing so, it often shifts the problem from one area to another."

So if the jury is out on which part of the foot should strike, and if it will cause stress in different areas either way, how should one avoid foot injury when running?

Competitor.com suggests:

"Studies show between 50 and 80 percent of runners are injured every year. Many of those overuse injuries result from a runner applying too much force on a repetitive basis. The way to reduce the chance for injuries is to run with the least possible musculoskeletal stress on your system possible with the least metabolic cost..."


And as always, if you experience foot pain or injury, contact one of our licensed Nashville podiatrists for your foot care needs.